All posts tagged: food writing

Signs of Life Well-Lived in Columbus, Ohio

There’s a particular genre of food writing that I just love, that always gets me right in the feels: Odes to grocery stores. But not just regular, American-style supermarkets, with glaring lights, wide aisles and wild shoppers. Definitely not places Whole Foods, or Fairway, or Wegman’s, or even the Jewel-Oscos or Associateds of the world. I’m talking about international stores, once dubbed “ethnic,” a word which has since (thankfully) fallen out of favor. Whether they’re a one-off mom-and-pop shop in a suburban strip mall, or they’re part of a larger chain — H-Mart, Seafood City, Patel Brothers — the presence of an international-focused supermarket in a community tells me so much about a place. Who lives there, what kind of food nourishes that community, the families and lives of a region, even how time and place have shaped that city or town’s economies. On Saturdays, my family went to 99 Ranch Market in City of Industry, or Greenhills in Diamond Bar — both about 45 and 30 minutes, respectively, from our home in Orange County. …

For Public Consumption | Racing Thoughts

Everyday around 5 PM, I can hear the trains rolling through Mt. Kisco from my desk. The aggressive horn starts off in the distance, and I can’t help but look at my desk clock. The sound comes closer, and I pack my bag. The doppler’d noise goes off into the distance, and I’m getting into a cab, eagerly waiting for my own train to whisk me back to the city. It’s a process that I neither hate nor love, but helps me mark the time nonetheless. This week’s been a doozy, what with rain, ebola scares and terrible commutes, it’s all a guy can do to hold out until Friday. Since Monday, I’ve been expecting that train to remind me to go home, perking up to the sound, only to be roundly disappointed because I remembered yet another thing I had to do once I got back to the city. Another event, another friend to hang out with. But now it’s Friday. Though I’ll be bartending tomorrow, I also have a relaxing weekend of adventures planned. I’m …

For Public Consumption | Seasonal Shift | End of Day Links

Summer bums me out. It’s hot, it’s sweaty, everything smells and can I please just take a goddamn nap already? Everyone gets SAD during the winter, but between May and September, I’m pretty much the worst. On an intellectual level, I understand why people love summer. The sun comes out en force and the world has shaken off spring allergies and any of its lingering greyness. Everything is so shiny! Carpe diem and stuff. Well, not for me. Fall, though. Let’s talk about fall.

For Public Consumption: End of Day Links

Back in high school, I was one of those earnest little newspaper kids, working with a ragtag crew of other writer-types for the Brea Olinda High School Wildcat. When I wasn’t playing Starcraft with the other dudes in the production room, I was studying for my AP classes, catching up on late assignments or working on lifestyle stories (such as they were at the age of 16). It was my first taste of food writing. The Wildcat was published once a month, yet we somehow got it into our heads to create an annual food issue. I don’t remember the details, but we were able to convince Brea’s “top” restaurants to feed our little gaggle—like, a team of 10—for free, wherein we’d review them in the Perspectives section. Journalism! Looking back, I’m pretty sure our little operation with restaurants like Souplantation and Claim Jumper—it was suburbia, guys—was an upper middle class grift. There were 10 of us! Eating for free! These places didn’t need our reviews—there was only a nascent “online” then, and there’d only …